Conference Program

The world-class SATELLITE Conference consists of the most relevant and important topics facing both satellite industry and end-users, and gathers a diverse group of experts to share their viewpoints. Below you’ll find the most up-to-date information; we recommend checking back periodically as speakers and sessions will be added as time goes on.

Hint: Use the search bar and the categories on the left hand side to help find what you’re looking for.

Monday, May 6

Monday, May 6
9:30 AM - 10:30 AM
What's the (Next) Big Idea?

Frequent technology disruption is the new normal in all aspects of our lives, and the space industry is no exception to the trend. Which technologies will disrupt the status quo? Which technologies or applications will rearrange the space value chain? Karl Klaus notes in the “Fourth Industrial Revolution” that the space industry revolution is now being driven by ‘spin-in’ benefits from other industries. We kick off SATELLITE 2019 with a group discussion on a range of technologies that may change the space industry status quo, including: cloud computing; new analytics and data fusion; 3D printing; lasers; robotics; block chain; machine learning; IoT; and new propulsion systems. While it is difficult to determine exactly when certain technologies might become “game changers,” this panel will focus on the “trigger points” which could advance the state of play for game changing technologies in space. Open to all attendees.

Monday, May 6
10:45 AM - 11:00 AM
Finance Forum Opening Remarks

NSR President Christopher Baugh kicks off our 2019 Finance Forum with an outline of the day’s program and his view on the state of satellite financing.

Monday, May 6
11:00 AM - 11:30 AM
The Global Quest for Space Leadership and Competitiveness

The number of international players in space is on the rise. Many established participants are keen to expand their space activities. In this new global space environment, the U.S. seeks to ease regulations on private space industry, thereby enhancing their competitiveness in the global market. For instance, the White House’s Space Policy Directive-2 instructs multiple departments to focus on developing a new regulatory regime for streamlining processes to ease the regulatory burden on the private sector.

On a larger scale, the globalization of space has increased pressure to reduce the cost of participation in space. Yet the race to the bottom may not be a one-way path. This presentation seeks to understand key levers (both market liberalization and market intervention) that can encourage private enterprise and commercial space sector growth including: policies, tax structures and regulations that enable a competitive space industry; adequate funding for national security space and space technology investments; and other initiatives and commercial space regulatory reforms.

Monday, May 6
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Rating Space Sustainability

With the fast pace of innovation in space systems, Space Sustainability remains a growing concern. In an attempt to address the topic, the World Economic Forum’s Council for Space Technology is developing a Space Sustainability Rating whereby actors can volunteer to undergo an evaluation of their mission through a questionnaire to establish a rating. A positive rating would showcase the level of sustainability a given actor is willing to adopt to minimize the creation of orbital debris linked to its mission. By sharing its rating, the actor would provide a single point of reference externally for their mission, thereby increasing transparency and placing emphasis on its debris mitigation approach, without disclosing any mission-sensitive or proprietary information. The rating could act as a differentiator and trigger positive outcomes (e.g., impact insurance cost or funding conditions), incentivizing other actors to improve their behavior.

This session will explore how the Space Sustainability Rating can add value for the sector and attract actors to participate.

Monday, May 6
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
The State of Satellite Financing: The Analysts Speak

Investment prospects in the satellite market are more complex than ever, and questions are more numerous than answers in this transformational time. With the GEO FSS business stagnating, and HTS prospects muddled in many markets, is the GEO business still a solid play? Are smallsats and constellations now the preferred investment target? Is M&A on the horizon, and will ECAs jump back into the game. Which markets are underhyped or overhyped? Bottom Line: is the satellite market still a solid long-range investment? This panel of financial analysts will explore these questions and provide their prognosis for best returns in this ever-changing space.

Monday, May 6
11:00 AM - 5:00 PM
SGx Keynote Series at SATELLITE 2019

The SGx keynote series returns to SATELLITE 2019, produced in partnership with the Space Generation Advisory Council (SGAC) and the Future Space Leaders Foundation. SGx presents a series of inspirational presentations about mentorship, career development for young professionals, and daring thought leadership. Speaker line-up will be announced soon!

Monday, May 6
11:30 AM - 12:00 PM
New to SATELLITE? Start Here!

Welcome to SATELLITE 2019! With 15,000 attendees, dozens of conference sessions, and more than 80,000 square feet of exhibiting space, SATELLITE 2019 can easily overwhelm first-time guests. This presentation explains how to navigate our event and provides an overview of our diverse range of attendees, vendors, and conference sessions. We’ll outline the different sectors of the satellite industry, provide a summary of market leaders and new entrants, and define many of the most popular terms and phrases you’ll hear throughout the next four days. Take notes, review them over lunch, and come back to our 101 course to learn more about buying and selling SATELLITE technology!

Monday, May 6
11:30 AM - 12:00 PM
The Future of Spacecraft Metrology

With growing trends for smaller and more powerful spacecraft, larger constellations and new production techniques, the testing of future spacecraft and space instruments will involve significant metrology challenges in many technical domains. The cost of testing, the precision of testing and the speed of testing must be improved so that the overall cost of spacecraft testing and launch is reduced and appropriate assurance provided. This presentation will explain how the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and its global National Measurement Institute (NMI) partners are working to adapt state-of the-art measurement technology in the fields of micro-newton thrust, micro vibration, large scale rapid precision dimensional measurement, 3D thermal imaging for environmental testing, optical ground calibration systems and miniaturized optical clock technology.

Monday, May 6
12:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Monday Luncheon & Keynote Address

Keynote speaker to be announced soon!

Monday, May 6
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
What is High-Throughput Satellite? An Introduction to HTS and Other Acronyms

Satellite operators proudly sell High-Throughput Satellite (HTS) services to a variety of customers around the world. At the same time, ground systems and technology developers sell hardware on our show floor to connect customers to HTS services. What defines HTS as “high-throughput”? Does high-throughput mean “high-speed”? Does the definition of HTS evolve over time? Learn about the history, evolution, and capability of modern HTS services, as well as other related acronyms, including: GEO, MEO, and LEO; and what the different bands mean in terms of performance and availability.

Monday, May 6
1:30 PM - 2:00 PM
Selling Commercial Technology to the Government

The US Department of Defense wants to reduce its dependence on costly custom solutions and buy more commercial products and services that have been modified for defense applications. In 2016, the Defense Contract Management Agency stood up a cadre of engineers and cost/price analysts to foster and concentrate the government’s expertise in commercial item acquisition. This talk will explain the statutory framework and streamlined acquisition processes that allow commercial companies to avoid the burdensome paperwork that is so often associated with selling to the government, including how one goes about demonstrating that a product or service meets the statutory definition of “commercial.”

Monday, May 6
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
5G: Integrating Satellites with 3GPP Standards

The satellite communications industry will play an increasingly important role in providing 5G across the globe with growing demands for anywhere, anytime connectivity. In preparation for this new era in communications the satellite industry, through the EMEA Satellite Operators Association (ESOA), has become a Market Representation Partner in 3GPP. Satellite operators are increasing their efforts to become part of the 3GPP releases for 5G, and the satellite industry is active in retaining and increasing access to the spectrum it needs to meet this demand. By proactively working on these efforts, the satellite industry is well poised to be a critical partner in the 5G network of networks.
This session will look at the role of standardization for 5G for the satellite industry and others, the need for spectrum to meet increasing user demand with 5G around the corner, and the other preparations the satellite industry is making including advances in satellite technology and, finally, how 5G will come together to meet its promise to bring 5G to everyone.

Monday, May 6
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Constellations: Do the Business Models Close?

During the past decade, the rise of satellite constellations has become hard to overlook. Constellation business cases have been speculated, criticized and commended, with different stakeholders supporting different opinions. One thing that everyone agrees on, coherently, is that it is a challenging business model. With some of the significant constellations – both, in size and funding – preparing to commence the deployment of their first satellites shortly, 2019 is expected to be a decisive year for this sector. This financial forum session will discuss the challenges, both pre- and post-deployment, as well as the strategic outlook for some of these business ventures. With over 100 satellite constellations announced for different applications, how many are likely to cross the funding barrier and make it into orbit, and more importantly, how many of those will be a business success?

Monday, May 6
2:00 PM - 2:30 PM
The Economic Impact of Mitigating Orbital Debris

Valuable near-Earth orbits have a clear trend to be congested due to the growing orbital debris population. The U.S. Government Orbital Debris Mitigation Standard Practices (2001) remains voluntary for the aerospace industry to mitigate orbital debris, because a favorable cost-benefit ratio is not so apparent to a “free-rider,” who places spill-over costs on the general public. The primary goal of this research presentation is to encourage the global acceptance of the Standard Practices on economic basis by dispelling misconceptions of mitigation costs and benefits scope. By addressing issues of space congestions, debris spill-over costs and value of protected space regions, Dr. Zhu will argue a case for significant mandatory actions and post-mission disposal for final mission orbits proposed by the Standard Practices. Further, this presentation will outline a dynamic model depicting societal benefits and mitigation costs along with a long-term perspective.

Monday, May 6
2:45 PM - 3:45 PM
How to Acquire Commercial Satellite Bandwidth for your Business

Now that you’ve learned a little bit about how HTS and other bandwidth services function, it’s time to find out how to acquire these services to power your business operation! This session is designed for attendees from all industries and with any level of expertise. Learn how satellites function within the network you’re trying to build or the solution you’re trying to find. Be aware of the bandwidth options available to your market and your geographic region. Learn how satellite services are becoming easier to install and manage — saving millions on infrastructure costs for commercial, enterprise and governments customers. Attend this session and know more about what you need to buy to meet your needs!

Monday, May 6
2:45 PM - 3:15 PM
The European Data Relay System (EDRS): Past, Present and Future

The space technology is evolving fast. Laser communication technology is now deployed in space as a complement of the well established RF technology. This presentation will explain the performance and service achieved with the first European Data Relay System node (EDRS-A) already in space since January 2016. This presentation will also address the expected additional services and capacity to be provided by EDRS-C to be launched in 2019, and the role and extension capability to be provided under the EDRS Global umbrella currently undergoing a system study development phase B.

Monday, May 6
2:45 PM - 3:45 PM
How Machine Learning Offers to Revolutionize Satellite Operations

With onboard processors increasingly gaining in computational power a significant change is upon us in how satellites, be these positioned at GEO, MEO or within a LEO constellation, can be operated and automated. Moreover, with dedicated AI chips becoming rated for the space environment, we are reaching the moment where machine learning can be integrated into the satellite’s flight software. This opens the door to disrupting mission operations, irrespective of their application in satcom or remote sensing, offering to enhance current capability, facilitate more complex operations or significantly reduce operational costs. This talk will cover research and development into AI for operations for satellites. Speakers will share examples of how current operational paradigms can be changed through onboard processing, in particular when combined with machine learning, to save operational costs.

Monday, May 6
2:45 PM - 3:45 PM
Startup Finance Roundtable: Choosing the Best Path to Growth

Startups are emerging in each segment of the space industry, targeting innovative technologies and approaches to compete with incumbents and broaden the market. But in the capital-intensive space industry, pre-revenue and growth stage startups must identify a financing path to support this development process. Yet while securing capital is one of the most important steps towards growth, it also brings risky pitfalls. How, and when, should startups look for financing? With approaches from bootstrapping, government investment, strategic partnerships, venture capital, and more, startups have a range of options that each deliver unique benefits and drawbacks. This roundtable will explore the impact of financing choice on startup trajectory, digging into the repercussions of financing on growth rates, strategic direction, and, ultimately, potential for market success.

Monday, May 6
3:15 PM - 3:45 PM
Next Generation Broadcast Service as a PNT Augmentation & Space Weather Service

NASA has been investing in technology demonstrations of a beacon service, now called Next Generation Broadcast Services (NGBS). NGBS is a global, space-based, communications and navigation service for users of GNSS and the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). NGBS will provide an S-band beacon messaging source and radio navigation available to users at orbital altitudes 1400 km and below, increasing the autonomy and resiliency of onboard communication and navigation. NGBS will deliver both one-way radiometric (Doppler and pseudorange) and fast forward data transport services to users. Portions of the overall forward data volume will be allocated for fixed message types while the remaining data volume will be left for user forward command data. The NGBS signal will reside within the 2106.4±3 MHz spectrum currently allocated for the Space Network’s multiple access forward (MAF) service and a live service demonstration is currently being planned via the 2nd and 3rd generation TDRS satellites. This signal will eventually also support other space-related broadcasts, including space weather monitoring and alerting.

Monday, May 6
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
How to Build Your Satellite Network on the Ground

This session provides a blueprint for the ground systems and hardware needed to connect to the satellite network. Building infrastructure on the ground can be cost prohibitive, but new advancements in antenna hardware and miniaturization are making satellite connectivity more accessible than ever. Attendees will learn the components of fixed and mobile ground systems, and about the leading system integrators that are building state-of-the-art connectivity networks for a range of bandwidths and wireless services.

Monday, May 6
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Big Science with Small Satellites

Small Satellites are becoming increasingly effective and efficient platforms for scientific research. This year, NASA launched the first and second interplanetary cubesats – MarCO-A and B – intended to test out new miniaturized communication and navigation technologies and, as a secondary goal, support the InSight Mars Lander mission.

Miniaturized technology is at a stage where meaningful science can come out of smaller platforms, and can even complement or support the scientific investigations carried out by NASA’s medium and large missions. A 2016 National Academies study title, Achieving Science with CubeSats: Thinking Inside the Box, noted that “CubeSats can potentially address important science goals… CubeSats are now part of a trend toward an increasingly diverse set of platforms for pursuing space and Earth sciences.”

This panel will discuss the advantages and the challenges to using small satellites for science and research purposes. The panel will consist of Principle Investigators of current small sat missions, prominent members of the science and research community, as well as representatives from NASA, National Academies, and the National Science Foundation.

Monday, May 6
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
The View from Venture Capital: Finding a Unicorn in the Haystack

The satellite industry remains a significant target for both new ideas and new capital as investors ever search for the “next SpaceX”. Whether it is broadband to fixed or mobile platforms, new launchers, large constellations, innovative EO or data analytics plays, VC players sees great potential in the emerging space market. However, despite the influx of funding, most new players struggle to present short -term business cases enabling typical 5X returns in 5 years. Uncertain addressable markets, competition and price erosion all serve as sizable challenges in the current paradigm. Will VC firms extend their return horizon and risk appetite, or will they eventually move downstream? What are the next big ideas that could match a VC led investment? The round table will explore the VC addressable space economy, with prognosis on business case viability and possibilities of high value returns.

Monday, May 6
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Legislative Issues Likely to Impact the Commercial Satellite Sector

In January 2019, when the 116th Congress convenes for the first time in January 2019, the Washington centers of power will very likely look quite different. The Democrats are poised to take back the control of the House, even while the Republicans are expected maintain control of the Senate, with the leader of their party in the White House. A new party in control of even one chamber means new committee chairs, new legislative agendas, and new leadership at the top of the chamber. Even as political controls in are in flux, the commercial space sector is undergoing its own rapid and fundamental change, about which this Administration and the 115th Congress is still struggling to gain understanding. The growth in the number of actors in space, multiple trends that are morphing quickly, and the overall expanding nature of modern space activities are disrupting traditional thinking and the existing government-industry landscape. International developments are adding to the complexity. Legislation has been steadily working its way through both chambers on topics as varied as space situational awareness, orbital debris, commercial remote sensing, payload mission assurance, and launch regulatory reform. Prospects are dim that any of these bills will be enacted into law before the clock runs out in and unenacted legislation dies at the end of this Congress. With new leaders in all ranks in at least one chamber next year, most all of these measures will have to be drafted again from scratch for their consideration. Useful to industry, Erin will provide a roadmap of where things stand on each of the major pieces of legislation of interest to the commercial satellite sector, including an overview of the committees and Members with jurisdiction over further action on these measures.

Monday, May 6
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Monday Evening Welcome Reception

Tuesday, May 7

Tuesday, May 7
8:30 AM - 9:45 AM
Global Satellite Operators: The Future is Now

International satellite fleet operators set the tone for the rest of the industry, especially during this period of changing technologies and business models. Our Tuesday opening general session features CEOs from the largest satellite companies in the world engaging with a group of guest moderators coming from a variety of backgrounds. The discussion topics will include: innovation that operators are looking for up and down the supply chain; how satellite services fit into Industrial Internet-of-Things and Smart City ecosystems; cooperation and competition with terrestrial carriers; bandwidth resources for the 5G era; lowering the cost of the overall satellite connectivity infrastructure; and bridging the digital divide. Guest moderators and speakers will be announced soon.

Tuesday, May 7
10:30 AM - 3:45 PM
Startup Space 2019 Entrepreneur Pitch Contest

Startup Space is a competition where entrepreneurs pitch their business and technology ideas to a panel of highly accomplished space professionals, investors, thought leaders, and fellow entrepreneurs. Contestants are placed into groups and are each given five minutes to pitch their company or product in front of a panel of judges. This is followed by a five-minute period during which judges ask questions or make comments to the contestants. Judges score the presentations based on a standardized set of various categories. The single contestant with the highest overall score overall will be named the contest winner and receive the grand prize.

Contestants can apply to compete through December 31, 2018. The final contestant lineup and judge’s roster will be announced in January 2019.

Tuesday, May 7
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Making Earth Observation Data More Accessible and Commercially Actionable

Earth Observation (EO) data is voluminous and messy. It does not adhere to a standard and is growing at a staggering pace. The increase in raw data exacerbates an age-old problem for those that look to use EO data to drive business decisions. Some industries, such as insurance and re-insurance, are heavily invested in the science of converting these disparate data streams into actionable business intelligence. Their investment is large, and their processes are proprietary. The cost of expertise and computing resources to take on this work is high, and it creates a significant barrier to entry for other entities or industries looking to benefit from earth observation data. In this session, the panel will outline the challenges facing data scientists in working with multiple EO datasets, provide examples of conflicting data structures, and highlight industries that are struggling with using this data. Our speakers will then highlight new techniques that are being developed to align and normalize disparate datasets to allow more accessibility and immediate usability.

Tuesday, May 7
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
OTT and Streaming Digital Media Services

Satellites have an important role to play in delivering worldwide video services, from live breaking news, to streaming mobile video and entertainment. Broadcasters and content producers need to meet the demands of their viewers and to be able to share important real-time events with the best possible image quality, while minimizing delay and buffering and presenting it to a global audience over the Internet – no matter where the event is taking place. This is a challenge facing both broadcasters and satellite operators, and the good news is that solutions to overcome it are already emerging and being deployed. Speakers on this panel will discuss how satellites can facilitate OTT and streaming digital media services and exceed consumer expectations.

Tuesday, May 7
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Software-Defined Satellites for a Software-Defined Industry

Software is beginning to drive innovation in the satellite industry in a big way. Developing satellites as platforms that can run multiple applications is giving rise to new business models, and software companies – some of them new to the aerospace sector – are poised to play a transformative role in the industry. Learn about initiatives which are being designed to allow operators to code for a platform and to design and run virtual machines on a satellite. In such an environment, developers can engage in continuous innovation, creating and deploying exciting new applications like software-defined OTT service, Push VOD, which promises to enable consumers to view video content without internet access. Will satellite operators follow the model of consumer services like Netflix and Spotify – transforming themselves from traditional businesses into software companies liberated from physical constraints? This panel would explore the current state of software-defined satellite solutions as well as the blue sky ahead.

Tuesday, May 7
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Government & Military Forum Session 1

The SATELLITE 2019 Government & Military Forum covers critical space technologies and issues impacting the public sector. The program is produced in partnership with the Satellite Industry Association (SIA). Session descriptions coming soon!

Tuesday, May 7
2:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Delivering Critical Data from Any Size Platform

As electronics have dramatically reduced in size and composite materials become more common, the opportunity for smaller platforms have become widely available, both publicly and privately. With the miniaturization of platforms and instruments, comes the challenge of maintaining on-orbit performance and calibration. This includes understanding how smaller instruments will behave on orbit and react to the harshness of space. Miniaturizing instruments does not mean we have to sacrifice performance and quality for size and cost. It means that SmallSat and instrument providers have to be more creative and resourceful as they design and build these architecture types. In this presentation, we’ll explore how SmallSats and miniaturized instruments come to be, from concept to launch, what are the challenges we face to maintain high performance, and learn how across the industry, from operational weather to defense, these tiny technologies compliment current constellations.

Tuesday, May 7
2:45 PM - 3:15 PM
Miniaturizing Satellite Antennas with Metal 3D Printing

Metal 3D printing (aka Additive Manufacturing) is a major component of the fourth industrial revolution. This disruptive fabrication method allows for high performance metal waveguide antennas, a critical part of any satellite, to be reduced to their minimum size and weight. Metal waveguide RF structures have the lowest loss and are the ideal choice for a high performance satellite antenna. Metal 3D printing allows for highly complex parts to be interwoven in a single solid structure and printed repeatedly with overall reduced size, weight, and cost. This presentation will cover how Metal 3D printing will usher in an era of mass customization, where the constrained volume remaining in a satellite can be filled with a unique high performance antenna that conforms to the space around it and provides a lower loss, higher performance solution than any competing alternative.

Tuesday, May 7
2:45 PM - 3:45 PM
Ka-, Ku-Band Backhaul Solutions for a New Wireless Age

Satellite backhaul is often the only mobile transport available in these remote regions, providing reliability and quick service roll-out, but also bringing increased latency and operational costs which must be mitigated with the right solutions. While early satellite backhaul deployments focused on voice only, the landscape has radically changed. Newer habits, mobile technologies and devices are driving forward solutions which have to be the best in efficiency, scalability and flexibility. 5G will provide even higher speeds and more services in a Cloud environment and with demanding QoS. Mobile operators have to invest in solutions which can best serve them today and are also geared towards their fast-evolving environment. This session will explore new emerging backhaiul solutions how they will leverage new Ka- and Ku-band satellites.

Tuesday, May 7
2:45 PM - 3:45 PM
Launch Services Roundtable: GSO and Heavy-Lift

Industry leaders unite for part one of a two-part discussion on the evolving technology and economics of the commercial launch industry. Part one will focus on the future of the GSO market and the impact of a new wave of heavy-lift launch vehicles entering the market. Medium- and heavy-lift rockets, thrusters, and other components have become much more efficient in order to lower costs. Do these lower costs work for both customers and providers? How flexible and nimble can GSO and heavy-lift mission get? How are the dynamics shifting in regards to U.S., European, Russian, Chinese, and Indian market share? Attendees will learn the answers to these questions and more during this exciting and interactive launch-focused forum.

Tuesday, May 7
2:45 PM - 3:45 PM
Protecting Earth's Natural Resourses from Space: Food, Water, Farms, and Forests

The Earth is our one and only home, and human activity resides in almost every corner. As our civilization advances, and as we put increasing pressure on Earth’s resources, we all share in the responsibility of caring for and maintaining our home. One way for each of us to better understand the health of our planet is to see it for ourselves. This session will explain the space-based tools at our disposal to protect our fragile natural resources, including real-time imagery/monitoring and video, machine learning, predictive analytics, and more. Environmental satellite technology isn’t just a financial investment — it’s an investment in the health and well-being of ourselves, our children, and future generations to come.

Tuesday, May 7
2:45 PM - 3:45 PM
Government & Military Forum Session 2

The SATELLITE 2019 Government & Military Forum covers critical space technologies and issues impacting the public sector. The program is produced in partnership with the Satellite Industry Association (SIA). Session descriptions coming soon!

Tuesday, May 7
3:15 PM - 3:45 PM
Advanced Lightweight Mirrors for Space-Based Missions

With more rapid, affordable access to space and the availability of large-volume fairings, owners and users of current and future space-based optical systems are desiring large-aperture or segmented aperture primary mirrors for their missions. This in turn is driving demand for new approaches to produce the optical components and/or mirror segments more cost-efficiently and with faster manufacturing lead times than traditional optical components. Harris is executing a mirror R&D strategy called Advanced Mirror Construction (AMC). This presentation will explain the motivation and initial results for the replication of lightweight, ultra-stable mirrors and mirror segments.

Tuesday, May 7
4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Closing Session: Space Leaders Forum on Navigating the Fractured Geopolitical Landscape

The space and satellite communities thrive on international cooperation. The ISS is a shining example. Commercial space is a global business and civil space depends on data extracted from collaborative science and research projects. Today’s world is much more fractured. Cold War-era divisions are reappearing. The leading economies are walling themselves off. How are the leaders in our community navigating their organizations through these turbulent times? Is this new reality a short-term or long-term reality? How do divisions impact innovation and safety in space? This session will address the elephant in the room, and outline what’s at stake if we lose our ability collaborate with our international partners. Open to conference attendees.

Wednesday, May 8

Wednesday, May 8
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Our Collective Role in Empowering Women and Cultivating Diversity in Aerospace

Supporting women and diversity in aerospace and other STEM fields is more than the right thing to do, it makes all of us better. It makes our work better. It makes our companies more innovative and profitable. Despite years of awareness, important voices and perspectives are still missing from our workforce. A diverse workforce breeds innovation and creative problem solving. We all want that, so how do we get it? From the value of mentorship to the importance of employee resource groups and diverse social groups, this roundtable discussion will be wide-ranging, and focused on identifying solutions for the audience to take back to their organizations and move the needle on diversity and inclusion. We will also demonstrate that diversity works by sharing success stories of diverse teams, technologies and architectures. Open to all attendees.

Wednesday, May 8
9:30 AM - 10:00 AM
The Role of Satellites in On-Demand Provision of Wireless Networks

Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) are transformative technologies for managing interconnected systems between a system’s physical assets and computational capabilities. Most of CPSs are networked, typically via the Internet or the cloud, or via special logical or physical networks, leading s to networked CPS (Net-CPS). The main thesis of the presentation is that the emerging technologies of IoT and 5G are indispensable enablers of both Net-CPS and Net-HCPS. The requirements for Net-HCPS design and performance evaluation suggest that a promising idea is to make the communication networks linking the components in Net-CPS, both programmable and flexible to changing operating conditions. This is precisely where Software Defined Networks (SDN) offer exciting new opportunities. This presentation will describe how these interdependencies lead us to a Software-Defined Architecture for Net-CPS and Net-HCPS — developments with huge implications on smart cities. Satellites, and more specifically satellite constellations, can play an important and indispensable role in these developments.

Wednesday, May 8
9:30 AM - 10:30 AM
Launch Services Roundtable: NGSO and the New Smallsat Rockets

Part two of our launch services roundtable will focus on the rising demand for NGSO launch services and a tidal wave of new smaller launch vehicles designed for business in the age of small satellite constellations. According to the FAA, there are approximately 50 proposed small launch vehicles being developed or conceptualized in the world today. These vehicles aim to give small satellite and constellation operators greater control over their business plans, and therefore, open access to space to a wider range of customers. This panel will both explore the new menu of launch options and address the challenges facing smaller launchers, including the tightening bottleneck, space debris and potential regulatory concerns, flexibility, and availability. The demand is out there. Will prices remain low enough for their target customers? How will the smaller launch vehicle operators accommodate the needs of the market?

Wednesday, May 8
9:30 AM - 10:30 AM
Remote Sensing Data Relay Networks: Busting Through the LEO Bottleneck

Remote sensing data systems in Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) need to have the ability to link that data back to the ground. Unfortunately, these systems face two significant limitations. The first is line-of-sight and the second is access to spectrum. In the proposed data-relay network architecture, remote sensing satellites would use their RF systems to offload their data to data-relay satellites when their orbits cross in LEO. The data would be routed between the satellites in the network and then sent down to the ground, with throughput orders of magnitude higher than RF systems. This session will address these limitations, the current use of satellite data relay networks and laser communications, the advantages and disadvantages when compared to traditional ground station networks, and the future of space communications.

Wednesday, May 8
9:30 AM - 10:30 AM
Government & Military Forum Session 3

The SATELLITE 2019 Government & Military Forum covers critical space technologies and issues impacting the public sector. The program is produced in partnership with the Satellite Industry Association (SIA). Session descriptions coming soon!

Wednesday, May 8
9:30 AM - 10:30 AM
Factoring 5G into the Future of Satellite Service Providers

Mobile backhaul and base station networking have long been an important business for satellite and teleport operators. NSR estimates that satellite-based cellular backhaul in-service units will grow at double-digit rates from about 40,000 in 2016 to more than 120,000 in 2027. The roll-out of 5G mobile service has the potential to accelerate that growth. The 5G standard will provide devices on the network with between 1 and 10 Gbps of speed with practically unlimited capacity – which translates into a requirement for backhaul that is 100 times greater than today. To keep deployment costs manageable, 5G networks will centralize most processing in data centers and use new technologies to interconnect baseband units with remote radio units at the edge, something known as fronthaul. That centralization means that fronthaul traffic will add considerably to the capacity demands of 5G. The long-term roll-out of 5G therefore depends on managing a hybrid mix of fiber, microwave and satellite. Teleport and satellite operators face a long-term opportunity to expand into the mobile niche and become much more than a service provider of last resort as they are today. What do they need to do now to prepare themselves for the opportunities to come?

Wednesday, May 8
10:00 AM - 10:30 AM
NASA’s Leadership in Positioning, Navigation, and Timing

NASA’s national policy positions on the use of the Global Positioning System (GPS) and its augmentations for PNT and science are developed and coordinated by the SCaN Program within the Human Exploration & Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) at NASA Headquarters. The National Security Presidential Directive 39 (NSPD-39) tasks the NASA Administrator, in cooperation with the Secretary of Commerce, to develop and provide to the Secretary of Transportation, requirements for the use of GPS and its augmentations to support civil space systems. This presentation will cover how NASA’s leadership role in the development of the GPS and other Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) has resulted in new capabilities available for PNT in space.

Wednesday, May 8
10:45 AM - 11:15 AM
Mission Assurance for Small Satellites

While the potential for small satellites for a wide range of missions and applications is rapidly growing, this potential is held back by a perception that small satellites lack reliability and have a high probability of failure. This mis-perception is fed by the historical focus of small satellites on the mission of educating students and the unique approaches used by many small satellite players such as commercial components and streamlined verification processes. In reality though, small satellites made by professional nanosatellite manufacturers for specific science and commercial mission objectives have very high rates of overall mission success. Mission success for small satellite missions is often achieved via a streamlined approach to verification that focuses on the specific technical risks faced by the mission and consideration of the overall architecture to build any required redundancy at the mission level rather than the individual components.

Wednesday, May 8
10:45 AM - 11:45 AM
Building Satellite Propulsion Systems for the New GEO/MEO/LEO Landscape

The satellite industry is going through a number of key changes with GEO Comsats migrating to High Throughput Satellites; LEO and MEO constellations providing a whole new array of commercial and defense capabilities; and a general migration across the industry towards smaller satellites providing greater capabilities. With this changing satellite landscape, the propulsion technologies and products that service the satellite industry are also going through dynamic changes. This panel will discuss that changing landscape for satellite propulsion and the new capabilities enabled by this changes.

Wednesday, May 8
10:45 AM - 11:45 AM
Government & Military Forum Session 4

The SATELLITE 2019 Government & Military Forum covers critical space technologies and issues impacting the public sector. The program is produced in partnership with the Satellite Industry Association (SIA). Session descriptions coming soon!

Wednesday, May 8
10:45 AM - 11:45 AM
Satellites, Teleports and Big Data

The big data revolution is big news on the ground, but how will it impact the business of connecting the highway and the skyway? NSR estimates that the biggest markets for big data via satellite will be in transportation, government/military and oil & gas – sectors where teleport operators are deeply embedded. Devices and connectivity are key parts of the mix, but so are applications: formatted data streams and data analytics are the end-products that customers actually need. Success in big data requires teleport operators to evolve beyond connectivity to management of complex networks, sophisticated information processing and a deep understanding of customer requirements. What are the the opportunities and business challenges for teleport operators and satellite operators and how will gain a meaningful share of a high-growth market?

Wednesday, May 8
11:15 AM - 11:45 AM
The Emerging Role of Commercial Spaceflight in Earth Remote Sensing Science

A growing portion of the NewSpace industry is the provision of Earth observing data from satellites built and operated by private companies. Satellite images offered by commercial companies now have resolutions up to an order of magnitude better than the highest-resolution government-owned counterparts that release their data publicly. Thanks to this, private companies have emerged as some of the top providers of key Earth observation data. These emerging space resources offer critical information about our environment and Earth’s changing climate. In the U.S. ad other developed nations with established space-based resources, it may be taken for granted that NASA/NOAA, etc., offer widely accessible data and monitoring of weather and climate. However, in politically uncertain times, these commercial resources can provide a continuous data record when government assets may not longer be available. Additionally, commercial Earth observing companies can provide data for countries that lack the capability to sustain their own space programs. This gives developing nations the ability to monitor their assets. The revolutionary high spatial and temporal resolution data from commercial satellites can also provide critical insight for natural hazard mitigation and disaster relief efforts.

While some government agencies and private companies have begun to utilize these commercial Earth observing datasets, the scientific community has been slower to jump onboard. In a Twitter poll of 60 geoscientists, only 45% said they use commercial datasets such as those from DigitalGlobe and Planet in their research, and 35% said they did not know commercial datasets existed at all. Even among scientists who use Google Earth for their research, many surveyed did not realize much of the data they were viewing was from commercial satellites from DigitalGlobe.

Wednesday, May 8
1:45 PM - 2:15 PM
How Satellites Break Cultural Barriers on the Digital Frontier

Based on consulting work across developing regions, I have learned that coverage and connectivity links are not the only barriers to adding the three billion people without internet access to the online world. There are a string of other challenges—power sources for recharging smartphones, sufficient income to pay for the service, literacy (basic and digital), language barriers, and lack of glasses to be able to read, to mention some of these. Yes, over a billion people cannot afford glasses, even though they can be made available for $2 or $3. This keeps them from being able to readily read information on their favorite sites and from inputting simple messages. How can satellite carriers and service providers bridge these last-mile divides? The presentation will explore some options, such as the linking of language communities, connecting of community wi-fi zones, creating and supporting micro-caching centers, and others. Contrary to popular opinion the whole world is not yet connected. There are billions of people in need of better connectivity and communications.

Wednesday, May 8
1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
In-Flight Connectivity: Next-Generation Service from New Satellites

Airlines are still connecting their fleets, and while the slew of deals in this area shows no sign of slowing, deal making for airlines is unlikely to get any easier. With LEO constellations looking to launch and more companies looking to break into this market, airlines potentially will have more choice than ever before. But, they are already confused by satellites and it only threatens to get worse. This panel will help demystify satellite technology and what it means to them. Speakers will also look at market developments and how service providers are adapting to the changing needs of airlines.

Wednesday, May 8
1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
Government & Military Forum Session 5

The SATELLITE 2019 Government & Military Forum covers critical space technologies and issues impacting the public sector. The program is produced in partnership with the Satellite Industry Association (SIA). Session descriptions coming soon!

Wednesday, May 8
1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
What's the Technology Roadmap to Low-Cost Ground Systems?

Times of drastic change can be tough times to maintain profitability. With established markets and processes, skillful managers can find plenty of opportunity to develop new efficiencies and trim costs. When services, technologies and markets are in flux, it becomes much harder to estimate costs, prioritize investment and make smart personnel decisions. Yet the same changes also bring new opportunities to replace high-cost technologies with lower-cost ones and re-engineer operations in major ways. How can teleport operators deploy technology and improve operational practices to open new routes to higher margins in a fast-changing market?

Wednesday, May 8
2:15 PM - 2:45 PM
End-user needs: More Than Just Satellite Data

Satellite technology already contribute to the achievement and monitoring of Earth’s complex challenges, including satellite-based earth observation, satellite communication and satellite positioning amongst others. Although there have been many examples of benefits from applying these technologies, there are still gaps in the available technology and barriers that increase the challenge for many classes of users. This presentation analyzes the unique barriers that increase the difficulty for end users to apply satellite technology. For example, in the area satellite-based earth observation, a key challenge is to ensure that large, specialized datasets are transformed into visually intuitive maps that support decision making by end users who manage aspects of the Sustainable Development Goals. In the area of satellite communications, a key challenge is to identify the combination of private sector business models, government regulation and public sector services that will provide access to phone, internet, radio and television services for isolated or low-income communities. The barriers are different for each type of satellite technology and for various types of end users. The presentation considers end users at the multilateral, national, subnational and local level, and provides recommendations on how to reduce barriers for end users of space technology at each level. The recommendations are based on a decade of research and professional experience by the presenter who has studied and worked to advance the use of satellite technology for development in the academic, government and non-profit sectors. The presentation will include findings from this long term research program, including trends in the use of satellite-based technology within African countries and management approaches among emerging space programs in Latin America, Africa and Asia.

Wednesday, May 8
3:00 PM - 3:30 PM
5G Satellite Flying Base Stations

Satellite and terrestrial systems have been developing independently, making the integration very difficult so far. However, the research programs and the standardization activities related to 5G have provided a unique opportunity to go deeper into the role of satellites in future communication systems and make progress so that satellites can be fully engaged in the 5G story. This talk will explore the possibility of expanding the 5G ecosystem by integrating the satellite component in the 5G architecture, and study the need and feasibility of satellite flying Base Stations. The talk will also analyze the strengths and technical and economic limitations of terrestrial and satellite systems so that both can be integrated in complementary way to provide economic and global coverage for many applications, and provide some guidelines to the link satellite design and thus, insight will be given into the required modifications of the air-interface.

Wednesday, May 8
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
On-Orbit Servicing in a Global Context

On-orbit servicing redefines the concept of long-term sustainability for satellite industries and space-faring nations around the world. This panel will compare and contrast the increasing interest among nations to develop orbital servicing technologies — from tugs, to repair, to end-of-life services — and how nations are approaching regulation of these activities. How is the U.S. poised for leadership for these activities? What are other nations implementing for regulation? What complicating factors exist in establishing best practices across the range of satellite servicing activities?

Wednesday, May 8
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Government & Military Forum Session 6

The SATELLITE 2019 Government & Military Forum covers critical space technologies and issues impacting the public sector. The program is produced in partnership with the Satellite Industry Association (SIA). Session descriptions coming soon!

Wednesday, May 8
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Integrating LEO Constellations into Teleport Services

The year 2019 is a critical one for the first attempt to integrate LEO systems with teleports since Iridium will loft a large-scale constellation of low-earth-orbit satellites promising to transform global communications. The potential success of OneWeb’s constellation could also have major market impacts for GEO satellite operators and teleport operators. Already, LEO operators are in serious deal-making mode with operators of ground segment to provide the gateways they need to manage and provide access to their constellations. At a moment when most of that impact is still to come, we seek answers from LEO constellations in development, GEO operators, teleport operators and the examples of Iridium, Globalstar and Thuraya integration into the business model of teleport operators.

Wednesday, May 8
3:30 PM - 4:00 PM
Innovative Satellite Services for Peru's Connected Transportation Network - A Case Study

Airbus and the World Bank are partnering on a pilot project, in Peru, to propose innovative satellite-based connectivity in commercial buses driving on the roads of Peru. Not only broadband connectivity will be provided, but new digital services will be proposed, fostering the digital transformation of the local economy. This presentation will share the results of, and include video from this pilot project.

Wednesday, May 8
4:15 PM - 5:15 PM
Closing Session: From the Outside Looking In: Industry 4.0 in Space

Fortune 500 companies are starting to view space as a business investment. Whether it’s a matter of accessing analytical data, acquiring global connectivity, or storing assets in a secure cloud, new enterprise verticals are getting into the space and satellite game. This panel features executives from companies within these new space-hungry industries. The group will share how they evaluate satellite assets and list what’s driving them (or preventing them) from investing in acquiring space capabilities. Open to conference attendees.

Thursday, May 9

Thursday, May 9
9:30 AM - 10:00 AM
What I Learned from Inking Facebook's First Space Industry Deal

The Space Industry can expand beyond its classic marketplace.
Using the lessons I’ve learned from the deal I prepared between Facebook and the space industry during a nine-month time period, my presentation will demonstrate the need for the space industry to adopt new approaches and ways of doing business. This feedback emphasizes the need to focus on the links between the technical solution and the end-market: market-fit, pricing, go-to-market etc..
This presentation also explores the need for soft skills in the space industry, and to be receptive of the needs of the new partners/markets/ecosystems. This is particularly relevant for young professionals, as this is rarely taught in engineering schools.

Thursday, May 9
9:30 AM - 10:30 AM
Antenna Technology for Advanced Connectivity Networks

With the introduction of new LEO and MEO constellations and the growing capacity and coverage of GEO satellites, multiple layers of satellite beams will come into being, introducing different coverage, transmission power, frequency bands, and other variables. To support these of heterogeneous satellite networks and to best utilize the available resources from multiple satellites and constellations, innovative antenna technologies are now emerging. This session will explore the importance of understanding new passive and active antenna technology, the role of both the satellite operators and antenna manufacturers and how both groups can work together to meet the demands of evolving networks.

Thursday, May 9
9:30 AM - 10:30 AM
Space Situational Awareness & Traffic Management

The need for improved space situational awareness and the establishment of an effective international space traffic management regime is growing more urgent with the emergence of plans for “mega-constellations” of satellites. As a technological society, our day-to-day lives are heavily dependent on the services and capabilities that are delivered by space-borne systems. This group discussion will explore new ideas and technologies that could allow space systems to operate safely within an increasingly congested space environment.

Thursday, May 9
9:30 AM - 10:30 AM
The Ocean of Things

As the maritime community enters into its digital age, the topic of autonomous vessels is everywhere. As we rely more on machines to become smarter and operate themselves, we need to ensure that they are given the required tools to effectively talk to one another. Historically, there have been the same few satellite players in the maritime world, but with the dawn of this new era, there’s room for more, and they should be welcomed with open arms. Between, L-band, Ku and Ka bands and other solutions, there’s a lot to discuss. During this session, we will examine how all players can work together to create a collaborative and complementary connected world out at sea. We will review solutions that are coming down the pipe, how they can help with new regulatory requirements, how some can complement each other and debate the best connectivity toolkits available.

Thursday, May 9
9:30 AM - 10:30 AM
Executive Roundtable: GEO Services Five-Year Forecast

Taking into consideration what was learned at SATELLITE 2019, this diverse roundtable unites industry executives for a high-level talk about the future of GEO services. Speakers will share their short- and long-term market forecasts for business in GEO, and cover expected/unexpected technical milestones, exciting new applications, potential unforeseen challenges and opportunities, and more! The description of this session will be updated as new speakers join the panel. Open to conference-level attendees.

Thursday, May 9
10:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Development of Wireless Sensor Networks for Military Search & Rescue (SAR)

This presentation outlines the results of a study that investigates and develops components for implementing an effective military and SAR (Search & Rescue) acknowledge/information/communication in closed network architecture. Since military and SAR personnel are always on the move, the dissemination of information requires a mobile platform to accommodate mobility of people. The mobile and wireless network platform should be able to sustain the remoteness and seclusion of military operation areas. Communication is one of key problems of a military operation especially due to environmental constraints. This study proposes on establishing a future soldier and SAR communication device with mobile Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) and Mobile Ah-Hoc Network (MANET) to suit the infantry operations in the urban and rural areas. The operational areas are considered to restricted and challenging locations.

Thursday, May 9
10:45 AM - 11:15 AM
5G Hybrid Fiber Optics for Offworld Mining

While leaky-feeder based distributed antenna systems (DAS) can provide reasonable data-carrying capabilities, their primary strength has always been dependability and continuous radio coverage, not high-bandwidth data transmission. A single system design that integrates both of these features has always been
somewhat elusive. Traditional DAS systems have also been typically designed for one operating band, such as 140-170MHz, 430-490 MHz, etc. This presentation proposes a system would theoretically allow for multiple bands to be used without the need for entirely separate systems. The system would provide a fiber-based backbone capable of both high-speed digital networking (both low latency and high- throughput) as well as continuous radio coverage in any band from 1MHz to 3GHz. While the primary use case this is being developed for is complete automation for underground hard-rock mines requiring digital data transmission with low-latency and high-throughput, this system is also a necessary candidate for extraterrestrial mining such as asteroid, lunar, and martian mining, which will face the same physical constraints on automation and communication as Earth.

Thursday, May 9
10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
Achieving Record Breaking Spectral Efficiency

As satellite operators face increasing data demands, getting the most out of capacity has never been more important. At the same time, it is crucial that both OpEx and CapEx savings are made. In today’s environment, the industry needs unparalleled efficiency at any rate, whether on a low-speed voice or data connection, medium-speed backhaul links or all the way up to ultra-high-speed trunks. With 10Mbps/1MHz now a reality, hear how optimum efficiency can be achieved by pushing the limits of spectral efficiency for any application and, if possible, on existing infrastructure. Learn about the technologies behind record-breaking efficiency and how they can help operators enter new markets.

Thursday, May 9
10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
Life After Life Extension: What Comes Next for On-Orbit Serviced Spacecraft?

Now that we discussed how global space agencies and industries are investing in on-orbit servicing, we turn our attention to the return on that investment. What happens to satellites after they’ve been serviced? What can be accomplished in the second or third lifetime of an aging spacecraft? This session will break down how on-orbit serviced spacecraft can help create new efficiencies and revenues, free up bandwidth, and provide back-up for critical operations and disaster response. Hear how satellite operators and agencies plan to put their revitalized assets back into action!

Thursday, May 9
10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
The Space-Based Cloud: A New Dimension For Cybersecurity

The emerging commercial space economy presents an opportunity for game-changing innovation through the evolution of satellite communications platforms to platforms that enable spaced-based cloud services. One area of innovation is the intersection of commercial space, cloud services and cybersecurity. Highly sensitive, high value data are strategic assets for organizations and, as a result of the terrestrial and cloud infrastructure, is constantly at risk of a data breach. Whether it is an organization such as finance/banking, government, military, oil/gas, media or cryptocurrency services or blockchain-based services; there is effectively an infinite opportunity to breach the global terrestrial infrastructure to commit cybercrimes that can have a disastrous impact. Speakers on this panel session will explain the advantages of cloud and enterprise network services in space. The conversation will include an in-depth look at cybersecurity services at various orbits. The panel will address the question – Can LEO/MEO/GEO support a roadmap of cloud services that includes blockchain based applications and services?

Thursday, May 9
10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
Executive Roundtable: LEO/MEO Systems Five-Year Forecast

Taking into consideration what was learned at SATELLITE 2019, this diverse roundtable unites industry executives for a high-level assessment of the battle for supremacy in Low- and Medium-Earth Orbit. Speakers will discuss the importance of scale when it comes to constellations, and share short- and long-term market forecasts. Who will fail and who will prevail in NGSO? Join us for SATELLITE 2019’s exciting final debate. The description of this session will be updated as new speakers join the panel. Open to conference-level attendees.

Thursday, May 9
11:15 AM - 11:45 AM
How Data Analytics are Deeply Affecting Space Telecommunications

Digital Transformation is increasingly affecting all businesses and Space is no exception. Big data and analytics offer better understanding of complex systems optimization as well as insights toward more effective solutions. Hardware can be simplified as the correlations between the specific performance of an individual unit and the overall system performances is better mapped and understood. This presentation will use examples from Thales Alenia Space’s digital transformation to show how data analytics supports significant overall capacity and availability gains for telecoms, and opens the way for software-based, continuously improved solutions within our customers’ operations.

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